If you approach them with any issue, they blame it on the developer. This is so they can sell you developer services, getting your current developer fired. Imagine your coding a website for someone and someone comes in when you are not looking and puts a disallow on the site. You know the default is to only disallow the admin panel and you never created a robots.txt file, nor do you even have access to the robots.txt file from the sftp. As far as you are concerned it does not exist. You then get a call from your client screaming saying that they spoke with WPE who says it is a common mistake by a rookie developer. As far as I am concerned the only person responsible for the disallow is the person who puts it there. You cant force code and not take responsibility. What other code has been forced that the developer will get blamed for?
Site speed is a major differentiator for WP Engine. It’s one of the key hallmarks of our platform which set us apart from our competitors. The technology behind this includes single-click CDN integration, our custom NGINX extension, and SSD technology. The CDN drastically cuts time waiting for assets and ensures resources are freed up for important requests. The NGINX integration provides a better experience for your visitors by prioritizing human requests over automated system requests. And the SSD technology works to avoid RAM saturation and improves backend rendering. For a deeper dive on our technology stack, check out this page.
The site I worked on had great SEO until switching to WPE. The site speeds slow to a crawl at certain points of the day. Not surprising since you are sharing the server with many other sites and they are tightly managing your percentage of that server. Any large spike that happens and you cant serve those requests. They just cant get to it fast enough. They were honest about this from the beginning so kudos to them for not hiding this.
From their backend process, the first customer type seems to be WordPress developers and designers who want to focus on development & design without dealing with hosting maintenance – and have clients who have some budget. The designer/dev builds the site directly in WP Engine’s staging environment, launches the site, then hands the website over to their client.
From their backend process, the first customer type seems to be WordPress developers and designers who want to focus on development & design without dealing with hosting maintenance – and have clients who have some budget. The designer/dev builds the site directly in WP Engine’s staging environment, launches the site, then hands the website over to their client.
Support is everything when you have a website and suddenly you mess up and accidentally do something to the site. Support techs have been stellar every time I mess up one of my site (I tinker around with the code too much for my own good). These techs specialize in wordpress so they can help you fix the issue easily and effortlessly. Highly recommend to those like myself who seem to mess with the coding too much haha.
From an overall infrastructure standpoint, we have partnered with Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud Platform to provide customers with a range of enterprise-grade solutions that deliver lightning-fast, scalable, highly available and secure experiences. In addition, having high quality partners like these allows us to provide data centers in wide variety of locations – 18 in total. This global presence gives us the ability to serve more customers at a local level, where they see further performance and speed improvements as a result.
Our actionable insights tools, like Page Performance and Content Performance are always a hit. Overall however, our most popular tool would be Application Performance. It provides code-level visibility to help teams troubleshoot faster, optimize their WordPress experiences, and increase development agility. It gives development and IT operation teams the visibility they need to build and maintain great WordPress digital experiences.

Customers can receive credits if WP Engine fails to meet their SLA. This credit will be determined as a percentage of your monthly fee for each hour they fail to meet their agreement. To receive this credit, you’ll have to make a request to WP Engine’s customer support within 30 days. Your credit cannot exceed a maximum of your entire month’s bill.

WP was a great company to work when I first started. Once the company started growing unfortunately the focus turned to meeting metrics. The company forces you to take part in occasional group activities on company time. If you work for this company, it is important to understand that although some people come off as cool and edgy, it is still a work environment and some people will throw you under the bus in a heart beat. This is the kind of job you come into, learn as much as possible and move on. Don't let the Facade of this company caring about you, keep you for too long.. In the end they don't give a care in the world about you.
WPE is over-rated. They have a lot of issues that people not in the know are unaware of. The canonical name wpengine.c causes double indexing on google and DESTROYS SEO. If you try to point the name back to your domain you run into issues with looping. They also force a no index in robots.txt without alerting anyone of doing so. This disallow gets copied over to the live site causing your site to not be indexed by google. Again DESTROYING your SEO. They added this disallow to solve the problem of double indexing, which does not work anyway because google still indexes it (the correct way is to use htaccess). So in the end the site winds up not being indexed and gets points against it from google.
Over the years, WordPress has evolved more than I could’ve imagined, and with more plugins and functionality being added every single day, the demands for a good web host did too. And thus, the search began. After doing a few hours of research for cheap but reliable hosting, I came across multiple hosting providers that provided hosting for only WordPress and nothing else.
Unfortunately, WP Engine's toll-free, 24/7 telephone support isn't available to people who've signed up for the Startup plan; you must be at least a Growth subscriber to get someone on the horn aroudn the clock. Otherwise, you're limited to 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (CST) hours. This could prove vexing if you're a Startup customer who wants to speak to a human being at 3 in the morning. At $35 per month, this seems a bit stingy. WP Engine compensates with 24/7 live chat, so you aren't totally left out in the cold if you're a Startup customer.
They make things seem easier than they are at times, to sell people on their service. e.g. the idea of instant transfer to them as if DNS delay does not exist. They have some poor recommendations at times. e.g. CName instead of A-Records. This sort of thing benefits them but is not best practice as you cant assign an apex domain to a CName. I found this sort of thing would happen often… they really sell people on the idea that their way is easier and better than everyone else, but going so far as ignoring best practices. This is noticable in their caching as well, which is how they get such great numbers in regards to speed, however it is not best practice to cache so aggressively.

Support is probably the feature that will make the biggest difference in your hosting experience. When you need help with your site, you want to talk to tech-savvy people who can solve your technical issues quickly, and are patient to help you figure things out. Since you're hosting on WordPress, make sure the support team is comprised of WordPress experts, so they can fix not just the servers, but the site as well.
I self-hosted WordPress for years until I started experiencing crashes every time a post made it to the first page of Hacker News. I switched to WP Engine right before speaking at a major event. Not only did my blog survive the traffic spike, but I’ve doubled the number of subscribers since then and haven’t experienced a single outage yet. It’s nice to pay someone to handle all the hosting BS that we’re no good at. They’re WordPress Pros.
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