This ties into the uptime percentages that web hosts frequently display. Uptime is defined as is the measure of the uninterrupted time that a hosting system experiences. Hosts usually advertise somewhere between 99 percent to 99.999 percent uptime. Assuming a 365-day cycle, 99 percent uptime actually means several days of unscheduled downtime, or not scheduled maintenance, for your sites. That means 99.999 percent brings your site down to only a few hours of downtime for that year. That's the difference between paying for a shared host and paying more for a managed host that will give you at least 99.99 percent uptime. To get to 100 percent uptime would require tens of thousands of dollars a month in hosting and system administration time. The intersection between cost and uptime is where most business owners find themselves, and that's why a managed host is again the choice for more business owners. They can pay five or six times more than a shared host would cost and get a slice of enterprise hosting that would otherwise cost tens of thousands a month.
They have partnered with StackPath (formerly MaxCDN) to give all of their customers access to content network delivery services. Using a CDN can drastically reduce latency and improve site speed since servers spanning the globe all work together to deliver site content to users based on their geographic location. CDN is free with all the WP Engine plans.
Torque Magazine is a leading resource for WordPress news. Content equips new and advanced WordPress users with expert insights and information to help them create, grow, and optimize their WordPress sites and build better experiences online. Along with three staff members, Torque features content from a collection of writers, each with different skill-sets and experiences with WordPress. Since its debut in July 2013, at WordCamp San Francisco, Torque has been on the forefront of news and events in the WordPress community. Torque is a WP Engine publication though maintains complete editorial independence.
I knew from the start that the #1 single most important decision would be the hosting provider. There’s loads of options out there and my business partner and I tested several of the key players in the market. Ultimately we went with WP Engine…while not the cheapest option out there, they offer the most impressive list of features. Add to that the quick responses we get from WP Engine’s support team and you’ve got a solid win.
According to WP Engine, it offers numerous support engineers per customer, and each one has years of WordPress experience. The CMS offers support via customer service software Zendesk by WordPress experts. Most tickets are answered within 30 minutes to get you back up online. The Business Package, which many companies opt for, includes phone support and the opt-in for a dedicated account manager to provide familiarity with the same person who can answer questions.

I’ve worked with various hosting providers over the years and WPEngine has provided, by miles, the best support ever. They helped us improve the management and quality of our site massively, particularly through the suggestions surrounding management of staging environments, spam signups/rogue traffic reduction and general maintenance. Furthermore, our site is running smoother than ever, despite continuing to grow in size.
I found WP Engine exceedingly expensive, its staff very unresponsive to resolving technical issues and , when you point this out to them, they force you to terminate hosting contract in 1 week, in total breach of their own T&Cs. WP Engine is highly unprofessional, techically unskilled and unlawfall, not to mention their ourageously high cost. Stay away
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