WP Engine also offers a high-end Custom plan that's designed for "large businesses and mission-critical sites," according to the company's webpage. With Custom, you get millions of visitors of month, 400GB of monthly data transfers, and up to 1TB of storage. You must call a WP Engine sales representative for pricing information, though. It's definitely not cheap web hosting, as WP Engine positions itself as a high-end managed WordPress host.

Content Performance is a product that allows you to pull insights from Google Analytics for your WordPress content and authors. Marketers and content publishers can easily access real site visitor metrics like page views, time spent on a page, and bounce rates to understand which posts, categories, or authors are outperforming, and why. You can build a stronger content strategy and improve site visitor engagement with Content Performance reports, accessible right in your WordPress Admin dashboard. No coding required.
That said, WP Engine plans are priced a bit on the high side especially compared to shared hosting, which is not helpful for those on limited budgets. However, for those that plan to scale their business in the near future, or are already generating a lot of revenue, the high price is worth the services they provide and the peace of mind that their site is safe and always running.
What followed, was nothing but amazement. At first, when entering the administration panel, I felt like it was a little bare bones.There weren’t halve as many pretty icons as there were on cPanel, which I was used to, and it was a bit strange to encounter something like this. However, after reading through their extensive documentation on how to do literally everything to start up Your Site, it was a true piece of cake.
By default, sites hosted at WP Engine with page that ends in a number, (e.g. example.com/page/1) or in a query arg, (e.g. example.com/mypage/?myproduct=name), will be redirected to the page before the number or query arg sequence begins (site.com/page, site.com/category, site.com/mypage/).* This setting, known as “Redirect Bots”, is a major SEO issue as it will limit Google bots to discover content on your site and impact website PageRank flow through your site.
If you want to cancel wp engine hosting plan its easy. First just download a backup of your site if you need to and then just under Billing- Invoice-Cancel Account. You don’t need to call customer service or chat with anyone wp engine makes it super simple to cancel. For more details click here to follow steps on their website how to cancel wp engine hosting.
WP Engine specializes in WordPress hosting, so as you'd expect, you should tap the massive CMS plug-in library for ecommerce tools. You can find useful plug-ins from Shopify, WooCommerce, and other companies. There are numerous email marketing tools, too. Drip, DirectIQ, Mailflow, and many other companies offer WordPress plug-ins that let you leverage customers' email addresses to make money.

WP Engine is by many experts considered the best in WordPress Managed Hosting, they offer automatic security updates, daily backups, one-click restore points, automatic caching, top-tier security, FREE CDN &  SSL Plus FREE Site Migration. WP Engine is not cheap compared to other WordPress hosting, but you get what you pay, and WP Engine has the best support and performance by the top WordPress experts so you can be sure your website will be handled by the best. Many well know websites are running on WP Engine because of the speed, security and hustle free dealing with technical aspect of your website.

I knew from the start that the #1 single most important decision would be the hosting provider. There’s loads of options out there and my business partner and I tested several of the key players in the market. Ultimately we went with WP Engine…while not the cheapest option out there, they offer the most impressive list of features. Add to that the quick responses we get from WP Engine’s support team and you’ve got a solid win.
Although WP Engine's price tag may scare off newbies, those who know WordPress will attest to the impressiveness of WP Engine's proprietary platform. Always updated with the latest hardware to maximize server performance, WP Engine boasts a market-leading software layer built exclusively for WordPress users. This includes the company's own caching system to ensure your site loads super quickly for visitors, a one-click staging area, and constant security monitoring to ward off online threats.
In 2007, WhoIsHostingThis.com launched the world's first tool to discover which web host a website uses. Since then, we have published 1+ million words of real-user reviews, 2+ million words of content from our experts and helped millions of webmasters around the world find their perfect web hosting provider, whether it is for a personal website, blog or small business. Read more...
I’ve signed up and been blown away by the site speed. Been running WP site for over 3 years with well over 20 sites (although culling this soon) and I’ve never had a better host. The difference in speed alone makes switching to you worthwhile but I know you do a lot more.I first heard of WPE via Woo Themes after the nasty attack they had and they were singing your praises. Very impressed so far.
And like speed & performance, WP Engine basically takes all those best practices and does them for you. They run automated backups to keep everything off-site & ready to roll back if something happens. Since you technically have an “install” on their server (rather than an account) – they tackle a lot of security issues globally on the server level.
With a 99.95% service availability guarantee, WP Engine has above-average reliability. The company's support portal provides nice access to a knowledgebase for the most commonly asked questions regarding WP Engine services, site migration, and common WordPress problems. In addition, the support staff is available via online chat, phone, and a ticketing system. Furthermore, the folks who are helping you are WordPress experts and can almost always help point you in the right direction.
The hosting itself is fine. But I think they reel in a lot of people that don't know much about wordpress and more or less take advantage of that by charging an exuberant amount per month for hosting. I've been in this game a while and I know what is a decent price and what is is not. I got a good deal with WP Engine so I signed up with them. That's the only reason I signed up. Hopefully they still honor the deal in the coming year but I doubt they will. My websites are running super fast so it'll be a shame if I have to leave.
Pros – high uptime, high performance (sites can handle 100s of visitors at once without nose diving performance), patches are taken care of, CDN is awesome, snapshot and staging site saves our developers 100s of hours of time, site migration plugin makes moving sites easy, support is responsive and 24/7 (a few years ago it wasn’t some there are conflicting things around the web on this)
That said – the tough thing about customer support is that so much of the judgment is anecdotal. Everyone has a story, but you never know if the story is because they talked to the one rockstar-vs-rookie having an awesome-vs-terrible day. Like I mention in every hosting review, the important part is to see if a company treats support as an investment or a cost.
A major focus for WP Engine has been, and continues to be, around contributing to the WordPress community. In fact, it’s another one of our values – Committed to Giving Back. Our commitment in time, money, writing, coding and thought leadership totaled more than $1.7 million in 2018 so far. The StudioPress acquisition is the next level for us in these community giveback efforts. As WP Engine moves from strength to strength, we have the resources to help the Genesis Framework to grow and flourish. In fact, 15% of all our customers are using Genesis, with 25% of our largest customers utilizing it. As a company, it’s a framework we are already very familiar with.
If you are looking to run a WordPress site and performance is of significance to you, look no further then WP Engine. The premium hosting provider's state-of-the-art technology, including hardware and software, is second to none. In addition, the support staff is made up of WordPress experts who can provide guidance and expertise instead of just creating support tickets. We found our experience with WP Engine to be outstanding, and the service was both snappy and simple to use.
WP Engine offers 60 days money back guarantee if you are not happy for any reason cancel your hosting within 60 days and get full 100% refund no questions ask. This refund policy applies to all the plans, personal, business or custom. So you can try wp engine for 60 days risk free and if not 100% happy just back up everything and cancel the service.
By default, sites hosted at WP Engine with page that ends in a number, (e.g. example.com/page/1) or in a query arg, (e.g. example.com/mypage/?myproduct=name), will be redirected to the page before the number or query arg sequence begins (site.com/page, site.com/category, site.com/mypage/).* This setting, known as “Redirect Bots”, is a major SEO issue as it will limit Google bots to discover content on your site and impact website PageRank flow through your site.
If you approach them with any issue, they blame it on the developer. This is so they can sell you developer services, getting your current developer fired. Imagine your coding a website for someone and someone comes in when you are not looking and puts a disallow on the site. You know the default is to only disallow the admin panel and you never created a robots.txt file, nor do you even have access to the robots.txt file from the sftp. As far as you are concerned it does not exist. You then get a call from your client screaming saying that they spoke with WPE who says it is a common mistake by a rookie developer. As far as I am concerned the only person responsible for the disallow is the person who puts it there. You cant force code and not take responsibility. What other code has been forced that the developer will get blamed for?
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