No. The least expensive plan provides 50 GB of monthly bandwidth. But more important is the number of user visits they allow. For example, the Startup plan offers 25,000 user visits per month. They have ways of differentiating between real users and bots and spammers, and the 25,000 applies only to real users. So 25,000 user visits should be fine for most sites. But the higher level plans offer more visits.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as a Managing Editor. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web hosting, music, utilities, and video game copy, Jeffrey makes comic books, mentors, practices bass and Jeet Kune Do, and appears on the odd podcasts or convention panel. He also collects vinyl and greatly enjoys a craft brew. 

After switching to WP Engine we saw site response times improve drastically from an average of 2100 milliseconds to 210 ms. Our previous host experienced regular outages, but since moving over to WP Engine we’ve seen reliability improve to 99.99% up-time. We would recommend them to any businesses or WordPress users looking for a scalable, responsive and secure hosting solution.
The hosting itself is fine. But I think they reel in a lot of people that don't know much about wordpress and more or less take advantage of that by charging an exuberant amount per month for hosting. I've been in this game a while and I know what is a decent price and what is is not. I got a good deal with WP Engine so I signed up with them. That's the only reason I signed up. Hopefully they still honor the deal in the coming year but I doubt they will. My websites are running super fast so it'll be a shame if I have to leave.
That said – the tough thing about customer support is that so much of the judgment is anecdotal. Everyone has a story, but you never know if the story is because they talked to the one rockstar-vs-rookie having an awesome-vs-terrible day. Like I mention in every hosting review, the important part is to see if a company treats support as an investment or a cost.
Some of our customers are highly technical, so whenever they contact us, it’s with difficult, interesting problems—not ones that can be solved with a knowledge base article or a simple, obvious response. Therefore, we started creating pathways for those customers to get to engineers faster—people who can work on the mind-bending stuff. Of course we don’t have that 24/7 yet, like we do with regular support. Fortunately, those problems are usually OK to be solved during normal business hours, so overall this approach has been effective.
After switching to WP Engine we saw site response times improve drastically from an average of 2100 milliseconds to 210 ms. Our previous host experienced regular outages, but since moving over to WP Engine we’ve seen reliability improve to 99.99% up-time. We would recommend them to any businesses or WordPress users looking for a scalable, responsive and secure hosting solution.
There are four different plan options offered by WP Engine for small and medium businesses. They primarily differ based on the number of sites you'll be able to host, the number of visits your site will be allowed each month, and the amount of bandwidth you'll receive. The Startup Plan allows you to set up one website, provides 50GB bandwidth, and will support up to 25,000 visitors each month.
This ties into the uptime percentages that web hosts frequently display. Uptime is defined as is the measure of the uninterrupted time that a hosting system experiences. Hosts usually advertise somewhere between 99 percent to 99.999 percent uptime. Assuming a 365-day cycle, 99 percent uptime actually means several days of unscheduled downtime, or not scheduled maintenance, for your sites. That means 99.999 percent brings your site down to only a few hours of downtime for that year. That's the difference between paying for a shared host and paying more for a managed host that will give you at least 99.99 percent uptime. To get to 100 percent uptime would require tens of thousands of dollars a month in hosting and system administration time. The intersection between cost and uptime is where most business owners find themselves, and that's why a managed host is again the choice for more business owners. They can pay five or six times more than a shared host would cost and get a slice of enterprise hosting that would otherwise cost tens of thousands a month.
Pros – high uptime, high performance (sites can handle 100s of visitors at once without nose diving performance), patches are taken care of, CDN is awesome, snapshot and staging site saves our developers 100s of hours of time, site migration plugin makes moving sites easy, support is responsive and 24/7 (a few years ago it wasn’t some there are conflicting things around the web on this)
If you approach them with any issue, they blame it on the developer. This is so they can sell you developer services, getting your current developer fired. Imagine your coding a website for someone and someone comes in when you are not looking and puts a disallow on the site. You know the default is to only disallow the admin panel and you never created a robots.txt file, nor do you even have access to the robots.txt file from the sftp. As far as you are concerned it does not exist. You then get a call from your client screaming saying that they spoke with WPE who says it is a common mistake by a rookie developer. As far as I am concerned the only person responsible for the disallow is the person who puts it there. You cant force code and not take responsibility. What other code has been forced that the developer will get blamed for?
Based on our experience with WP Engine, we found the interface to be incredibly straightforward. The customer dashboard is incredibly responsive, fast, and easy to navigate. It's apparent that WP Engine has focussed on having a modern home website — showing off the company's commitment to usability in every aspect of its business model. Once our site was launched, we were in the typical wp-admin area of WordPress and were able to get a wait time of only 42 milliseconds for our first byte. We probably don't have to tell you this, but that is extremely fast!
Over the years, WordPress has evolved more than I could’ve imagined, and with more plugins and functionality being added every single day, the demands for a good web host did too. And thus, the search began. After doing a few hours of research for cheap but reliable hosting, I came across multiple hosting providers that provided hosting for only WordPress and nothing else.
By default, sites hosted at WP Engine with page that ends in a number, (e.g. example.com/page/1) or in a query arg, (e.g. example.com/mypage/?myproduct=name), will be redirected to the page before the number or query arg sequence begins (site.com/page, site.com/category, site.com/mypage/).* This setting, known as “Redirect Bots”, is a major SEO issue as it will limit Google bots to discover content on your site and impact website PageRank flow through your site.
That’s where managed WordPress hosting comes in. WP Engine takes care of (nearly) all speed concerns. They have customized servers with extremely aggressive caching and even more advanced “stack” than a typical web host. They also have trained support who will go into your WordPress install and identify the exact chokepoint to get your site moving.
If you approach them with any issue, they blame it on the developer. This is so they can sell you developer services, getting your current developer fired. Imagine your coding a website for someone and someone comes in when you are not looking and puts a disallow on the site. You know the default is to only disallow the admin panel and you never created a robots.txt file, nor do you even have access to the robots.txt file from the sftp. As far as you are concerned it does not exist. You then get a call from your client screaming saying that they spoke with WPE who says it is a common mistake by a rookie developer. As far as I am concerned the only person responsible for the disallow is the person who puts it there. You cant force code and not take responsibility. What other code has been forced that the developer will get blamed for?
A major focus for WP Engine has been, and continues to be, around contributing to the WordPress community. In fact, it’s another one of our values – Committed to Giving Back. Our commitment in time, money, writing, coding and thought leadership totaled more than $1.7 million in 2018 so far. The StudioPress acquisition is the next level for us in these community giveback efforts. As WP Engine moves from strength to strength, we have the resources to help the Genesis Framework to grow and flourish. In fact, 15% of all our customers are using Genesis, with 25% of our largest customers utilizing it. As a company, it’s a framework we are already very familiar with.
WP Engine is the world’s leading WordPress digital experience platform that gives enterprises and agencies the agility, performance, intelligence, and integrations they need to drive their business forward faster. WP Engine’s combination of tech innovation and an award-winning team of WordPress experts are trusted by over 70,000 companies across over 140 countries to provide counsel and support helping brands create world-class digital experiences. Founded in 2010, WP Engine is headquartered in Austin, Texas, and has offices in San Francisco, California; San Antonio, Texas; London, England; and Limerick, Ireland.
WP Engine is the best-managed WordPress hosting provider founded by entrepreneur Jason Cohen in 2010. Jason is a very smart and brilliant entrepreneur where he funded other companies’ prior WP Engine. WP Engine is Headquartered in Austin, Texas and now has over 700 employees. WP Engine support over 85,000 customers in over 140 countries, and over 500,000 web experiences globally. The goal for WP Engine was to give customers fully managed WordPress hosting so they can focus on their business and not on the hosting itself. He hired only professional WordPress experts to help manage and support WP Engine. The Austin-based company offers multiple hosting plans, all of which are optimized for WordPress.
According to WP Engine, it offers numerous support engineers per customer, and each one has years of WordPress experience. The CMS offers support via customer service software Zendesk by WordPress experts. Most tickets are answered within 30 minutes to get you back up online. The Business Package, which many companies opt for, includes phone support and the opt-in for a dedicated account manager to provide familiarity with the same person who can answer questions.

Welcome to WP Engine’s system status page. If you want to keep on top of any disruptions in service to our WP platform, support services, or product features, this is the page to check. We report major outages to this status page. This is great feature if you want to see if your server is down or what is the issue with wp engine hosting you can check wp engine system status.
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WPE is over-rated. They have a lot of issues that people not in the know are unaware of. The canonical name wpengine.c causes double indexing on google and DESTROYS SEO. If you try to point the name back to your domain you run into issues with looping. They also force a no index in robots.txt without alerting anyone of doing so. This disallow gets copied over to the live site causing your site to not be indexed by google. Again DESTROYING your SEO. They added this disallow to solve the problem of double indexing, which does not work anyway because google still indexes it (the correct way is to use htaccess). So in the end the site winds up not being indexed and gets points against it from google.
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