The most basic plan, Startup (starting at $35 per month), supports one WordPress installation, 25,000 monthly visitors, 50GB of monthly data transfers, and a scant 10GB of storage. Moving up the ladder is Growth (starting at $115 per month), a tier that offers five WordPress installations, 100,000 visitors, 200GB of monthly data transfers, and 20GB of storage. Building on Growth is Scale (starting at $290 per month), which boasts 15 WordPress installations, 400,000 visits, 400GB of monthly data transfers, and 30GB of storage. Pressable, a rival managed WordPress host, boasts plans with larger specs, but also larger prices.
A major focus for WP Engine has been, and continues to be, around contributing to the WordPress community. In fact, it’s another one of our values – Committed to Giving Back. Our commitment in time, money, writing, coding and thought leadership totaled more than $1.7 million in 2018 so far. The StudioPress acquisition is the next level for us in these community giveback efforts. As WP Engine moves from strength to strength, we have the resources to help the Genesis Framework to grow and flourish. In fact, 15% of all our customers are using Genesis, with 25% of our largest customers utilizing it. As a company, it’s a framework we are already very familiar with.
According to WP Engine, it offers numerous support engineers per customer, and each one has years of WordPress experience. The CMS offers support via customer service software Zendesk by WordPress experts. Most tickets are answered within 30 minutes to get you back up online. The Business Package, which many companies opt for, includes phone support and the opt-in for a dedicated account manager to provide familiarity with the same person who can answer questions.
But I have found 1 that is smaller, US based, and their technical people are on top of everything, immediately….We use vps and most of our clients eventually transfer to them. MD Hosting…truly their support is in a class of their own. Privately owned and very competetive pricing. We have been on their hosting for over 2 years…its what hosting should be.
Wordpress sites need dependable hosting that fits with their algorithms & setup. WP Engine has just the right hosting IMO for Wordpress, the sites run very smoothly and they are very secure. I'm able to upload some large photos without any issue. If you are sick of having your Wordpress site lag or are just having any issues with uploading, you should make the switch to WP Engine Hosting.
I have used quite a few big name hosting companies through the years but they were all the hosting companies that sell their service by price and with the 99.9% uptime promise which is usually pure BS. After years of issues with downtime over an hour at a time slow speed spells and tech support totally denying there was a problem, I switched my main WordPress site which is a life insurance website to WP Engine. The change was like going from driving a Pinto to a Mercedes Benz. I now have consistent super speed, great security which is a major factor for a WordPress site and a team of people that handle all of the updates and actually maintain the website. They even keep track of everyones plugins to make sure none of the plugins are prone to problems that consume heavy resources or become security risks. The only thing I can say is you get what you pay for. I wish I new about these people years ago. It could have saved me a ton of aggravation. When you think of the thousands of dollars you can invest into website design, it only makes good sense to use good hosting. A hosting company can either make or break a nice website.
This is important when considering the choice of a web host and how it could affect the SEO of an individual site. Google takes site speed into account with their search algorithm because they have found that every additional 100ms of page-load time mean a 20 percent drop in traffic. The longer your site takes to load, the more visitors will abandon the site and go about their day. You want a host that is capable of serving pages in 1.5 seconds or less. Business owners who migrate to WP Engine say it sees their sites load an average of 2-4 times faster, and notice an immediate increase in their search engine results.
WordPress is the backbone that supports millions of websites, so it's not surprising that many web hosting services focus exclusively on hosting one of the world's most popular content management systems—WP Engine among them. WP Engine is a high quality host that boasts excellent uptime, WordPress-specific security, daily backups, real-time threat detection, cloud platform flexibility, and other excellent features. Overall, the enterprise-class managed WordPress plans, for which WP Engine is an Editors' Choice, can get your site up and running in no time, but you'll need to look elsewhere for domain names and creating email accounts.
HostingAdvice.com is a free online resource that offers valuable content and comparison services to users. To keep this resource 100% free for users, we receive advertising compensation from the hosts listed on this page. Along with key review factors, this compensation may impact how and where hosts appear on the page (including, for example, the order in which they appear). HostingAdvice.com does not include listings for all web hosts.
Some of our customers are highly technical, so whenever they contact us, it’s with difficult, interesting problems—not ones that can be solved with a knowledge base article or a simple, obvious response. Therefore, we started creating pathways for those customers to get to engineers faster—people who can work on the mind-bending stuff. Of course we don’t have that 24/7 yet, like we do with regular support. Fortunately, those problems are usually OK to be solved during normal business hours, so overall this approach has been effective.

For beginners, installing a WordPress theme and getting a site up and running couldn't be easier. For more experienced folks, such as myself, WP Engine's advanced features, such as single-click development staging areas, Git integration, multiple server locations, CDN compatibility, and a ton of other niceties, can't be beat. These features make the monthly price worthwhile, compared to what the more economically competitive hosts offer.”


And then there’s a separate level of managed WordPress Hosting where you are not really buying hosting per se – but rather services to keep your WordPress install live. Basically, a Managed WordPress Hosting service offers a menu of services tailored to WordPress at a higher price point, so that the website owner can focus less on speed + security and more on the website content + functionality.
By default, sites hosted at WP Engine with page that ends in a number, (e.g. example.com/page/1) or in a query arg, (e.g. example.com/mypage/?myproduct=name), will be redirected to the page before the number or query arg sequence begins (site.com/page, site.com/category, site.com/mypage/).* This setting, known as “Redirect Bots”, is a major SEO issue as it will limit Google bots to discover content on your site and impact website PageRank flow through your site.
Malicious code can embed itself into a website by writing to the file-system. This occurs when a vulnerability is present in a theme or plugin that leaves the door open for malicious injection. The WP Engine environment limits the processes that can write to disk. So even if you’re using a theme or a plugin with a vulnerability, it is harder for them to be exploited.
I have used quite a few big name hosting companies through the years but they were all the hosting companies that sell their service by price and with the 99.9% uptime promise which is usually pure BS. After years of issues with downtime over an hour at a time slow speed spells and tech support totally denying there was a problem, I switched my main WordPress site which is a life insurance website to WP Engine. The change was like going from driving a Pinto to a Mercedes Benz. I now have consistent super speed, great security which is a major factor for a WordPress site and a team of people that handle all of the updates and actually maintain the website. They even keep track of everyones plugins to make sure none of the plugins are prone to problems that consume heavy resources or become security risks. The only thing I can say is you get what you pay for. I wish I new about these people years ago. It could have saved me a ton of aggravation. When you think of the thousands of dollars you can invest into website design, it only makes good sense to use good hosting. A hosting company can either make or break a nice website.

WP was a great company to work when I first started. Once the company started growing unfortunately the focus turned to meeting metrics. The company forces you to take part in occasional group activities on company time. If you work for this company, it is important to understand that although some people come off as cool and edgy, it is still a work environment and some people will throw you under the bus in a heart beat. This is the kind of job you come into, learn as much as possible and move on. Don't let the Facade of this company caring about you, keep you for too long.. In the end they don't give a care in the world about you.

Security – At WP Engine, our mission is to help our customers win online. We know that our customers’ sites represent their businesses, their livelihoods. They rely on us to protect them from attacks. As a result of our security layer, we block over 150 million bad requests every month. We proactively block numerous web application attacks, provide security maintenance and craft a one-off plugin/patches for vulnerable customers and automatically upgrade customer sites with the latest security updates.
We have run many clients on WordPress Engine and have had mixed reviews with our last experience ranging in the “awful” category. DO NOT go to them if you run a high profile client. Use Linode or similar. They use Rackspace for their hosting (which sucks) so any large scale sites will need to go to a better host since they don’t actually manage their own servers. Here are some issues we’ve run into:
×