They make things seem easier than they are at times, to sell people on their service. e.g. the idea of instant transfer to them as if DNS delay does not exist. They have some poor recommendations at times. e.g. CName instead of A-Records. This sort of thing benefits them but is not best practice as you cant assign an apex domain to a CName. I found this sort of thing would happen often… they really sell people on the idea that their way is easier and better than everyone else, but going so far as ignoring best practices. This is noticable in their caching as well, which is how they get such great numbers in regards to speed, however it is not best practice to cache so aggressively.
All plans come with many excellent features, including a content delivery network (CDN) for faster page load times, staging environments so you can test site changes in a non-public environment, and WP Engine's own LargeFS software for transferring and storing large amounts of data. Here's another important feature: you can select Amazon Web Services or Google Cloud Platform as your site's backbone, enabling no-downtime scalability and tight security. Pressable does not give you this option. Cloudways, on the other hand, lets you select one of five cloud-based infrastructure platforms.
If you run a small business that doesn't require enterprise-class WordPress hosting, I suggest checking out A2, the category's co-Editors' Choice. The Linux-based A2 offers four excellent WordPress hosting tiers, starting at $7.99 per month, offers unlimited storage and monthly data transfers across the board. The plans top out with the $24.46 per month managed package that includes unlimited databases and websites.
They need to have predictable plugins; predictable visitor patterns; predictable use cases. Every hosting company has rules (or very real physical limits), but WP Engine goes a bit further to define what you can and can’t have on your WordPress install in addition to tiered overage pricing to discourage seasonal traffic spikes and local storage usage.
Customers can receive credits if WP Engine fails to meet their SLA. This credit will be determined as a percentage of your monthly fee for each hour they fail to meet their agreement. To receive this credit, you’ll have to make a request to WP Engine’s customer support within 30 days. Your credit cannot exceed a maximum of your entire month’s bill.
Recruitment process here is a complete sham. The only place I know where you submit your application and then you get a canned response five minutes later indicating "thanks but no thanks". Their recruiters, and I use that term very loosely, don't have the fundamental skills to appropriately vet candidates if all they do is push a button to send off lame canned response notices. Where can I apply for that job because it sounds easy to be lazy.
That said – the tough thing about customer support is that so much of the judgment is anecdotal. Everyone has a story, but you never know if the story is because they talked to the one rockstar-vs-rookie having an awesome-vs-terrible day. Like I mention in every hosting review, the important part is to see if a company treats support as an investment or a cost.
Unfortunately, WP Engine's toll-free, 24/7 telephone support isn't available to people who've signed up for the Startup plan; you must be at least a Growth subscriber to get someone on the horn aroudn the clock. Otherwise, you're limited to 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (CST) hours. This could prove vexing if you're a Startup customer who wants to speak to a human being at 3 in the morning. At $35 per month, this seems a bit stingy. WP Engine compensates with 24/7 live chat, so you aren't totally left out in the cold if you're a Startup customer.
All plans come with many excellent features, including a content delivery network (CDN) for faster page load times, staging environments so you can test site changes in a non-public environment, and WP Engine's own LargeFS software for transferring and storing large amounts of data. Here's another important feature: you can select Amazon Web Services or Google Cloud Platform as your site's backbone, enabling no-downtime scalability and tight security. Pressable does not give you this option. Cloudways, on the other hand, lets you select one of five cloud-based infrastructure platforms.

WP Engine also offers a number of premium security features. The WordPress core is automatically updated to the latest version for you. WP Engine thoroughly tests any major core updates before upgrading their customers. They have a proprietary intrusion detection and prevention system to block any DDoS attacks, brute force attacks, JavaScript/SQL-injection attacks and more.
×